I – Z

Send us an email
Tel: 051 388 255

John F Kennedy Homestead

 

The birthplace of President John.F.Kennedy’s great- grandfather is about 6km from New Ross. It’s in Dunganstown which is in our Parish of Horeswood. He would have gone to mass in St. Brigid’s Church,Ballykelly. Patrick Kennedy was born here in 1823. He worked as a cooper in Cherry’s Brewery, New Ross. A cooper makes barrels. He decided to emigrate to America when he was 25 years old. His father was a tenant farmer and could be evicted for not paying the rent. Times were hard because of the famine in Ireland. Patrick left in 1848. He first went to Liverpool and then to Boston on a ship called the S.S.Washington Irving.

He met Bridget Murphy from Gusserane and they married. They lived in a place called Noodle Island.They lived in a tenement. They had three daughters and a son called Patrick Joseph or P.J. Patrick died in 1858 from cholera.

 

John F Kennedy Homestead

John F Kennedy Homestead

 

He was only 35 years old. Bridget was a strong woman. She worked as a house-maid for the rich, and then in a grocery store. Later she became the owner of this shop. She helped P.J. to become the owner of two saloons. He married Mary Hickey and he became very wealthy. They had a son called Joseph who also became very rich. He married Rose Fiztgerald and became ambassador to the U.K. Their son John.F. Kennedy became President of the U.S. in 1961. He was the first Catholic and youngest President of America.

 

Cherry's Brewery

Cherry's Brewery, Creywell, New Ross, where Patrick Kennedy worked as a cooper before emigrating to Boston. It no longer stands here.

 

PJ Kennedy

Young Patrick Joseph or P.J.Kennedy -the President's grandfather

 

John F Kennedy

President John F.Kennedy

 

The Kennedy homestead is a one-storey house.The only bit that is left of the house is the stables. The cow house was rebuilt and is now used as a gift shop and where they show the audio-video. Patrick Grennan,a cousin of JFK, is the owner and tour guide.

The beds were very simple with an iron frame . There were no blankets but heavy overcoats were thrown on the bed to give more heat. To heat up the bed they used a cylinder shaped porcelain hot water bottle. As there was no running water they used a chamber pot which was up in the bedroom.

 

Kennedy Homestead Bedroom

What the bedroom looked like

 

During the day they used a dry toilet in a little building usually away from the dwelling house. Washing was done in a basin and sometimes in a bath in front of the fire.

 

President Kennedy’s visit on June 27th 1963

 

On June 27th 1963 President Kennedy and his family came back to his ancestral home. For this event a red phone was placed behind the stables. If he lifted this phone it meant that a nuclear war was starting .When he got there he said, “We drink a cup of tea for the Kennedys who left and the Kennedys who stayed”.He also said to Mrs.Ryan that he

“would come back again when there was not such a big crowd.”

The old house of Patrick Kennedy is now a two-storey house with a porch. This porch was built on to use for toilets during the President’s visit. His final farewell to Ireland was “I will come back in the Spring.” He never made that journey back to Ireland because he was shot at around 12.30p.m in Dallas,Texas on November 22nd 1963.

It was exactly 105 years to the day that his great-grand father,Patrick Kennedy from Dunganstown, passed away-the man who started the Kennedy dynasty.

 

President Kennedy Homestead Visit

President Kennedy's visit to Dunganstown June 27, 1963

 

Ballykelly school children line up before they set off to Dunganstown on June 27th 1963, to provide a guard of honour for JFK. They are carrying the Irish and American flags.
 
John F Kennedy 1947 Homestead Visit

This is a copy of the original photograph taken by JFK when he made another visit to the homestead as a Congressman in 1947.

 

Colour picture of the Kennedy family in Dunganstown

Colour picture of the Kennedy family in Dunganstown

 

On the front wall of the homestead today is a plaque ,which was unveiled in 1993 by Ambassador Smith. It has this written on it “Birthplace of Patrick Kennedy, Great Grandfather of President John .F.Kennedy U.S.A who returned to his ancestral home on 27th June, 1963.” The Kennedy Homestead is well worth a visit as Patrick Grennan is very friendly and gives a fantastic guided tour.

 

John F Kennedy Sculpture New Ross

This fine life-sized bronze sculpture of John F.Kennedy at the quay in New Ross, was unveiled by his sister, Jean Kennedy Smith on June 29, 2008. The sculpture was designed by Ann Meldon Hugh and includes extracts from some of Kennedy's famous speeches, busts of his cousins in Wexford, and depicts the homestead in Dunganstown and the White House.

 

Memorial Plaque

Memorial Plaque

 On the 50th Anniversary of JFK’s visit to Dunganstown a new Kennedy Homestead Visitor Centre was opened there by Taoiseach Enda Kenny and JFK’s daughter Caroline Kennedy.

 

Whitechurch Float, Lá le Pádraig 2013 remembers JFK and the Homecoming.

.

 

John F Kennedy Park and Arboretum

 

The Fountain

The Fountain

 

At the entrance to J.F. Kennedy Park is a fountain with the famous words you are listening to: “Ask not what your country can do for you- ask what you can do for your country.” These famous words were said by President Kennedy on Jan.20th 1961 at his inaugural speech or the day he became President of the U.S. It is also written in Irish: “Ná fiafraigh cén mhaith duit do thír. Fiafraigh cén mhaith don tír duit féin”. President Kennedy visited the homestead of his great grand-father on June 27 1963 and sadly on Nov.22 of that year he was assassinated.

 

The park is dedicated to the memory of John F.Kennedy . It covers over 600 acres with over 4,500 trees and shrubs from all over the world and is situated on the southern slopes of Slieve Coillte.There is a fine Visitor Centre there built with Liscannor Stone. The word arboretum comes from the Latin word for a tree-arbor. The Irish word for a tree is crann and so a place with lots of trees (arboretum) is “crannlann” in Irish. Also Slieve (Sliabh) Coillte means “wooded mountain”.

 

Opening Kennedy Park May 29, 1968

Opening Kennedy Park May 29, 1968

 

This picture shows President Éamonn de Valera unveiling the stone plaque at the opening. Even though an old man, he also attended President Kenedy’s funeral in 1963. Also in the picture is Fr. Mernagh who was then a curate in Ballykelly.

 

The plaque reads:

 

‘This park is dedicated to the memory of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, President o the United States of America, 20th January 1961 to 22nd November 1963. It is a tribute to the life and work of President Kennedy from United States citizens of Irish origin, organised by the combined efforts of Irish American Societies and executed through the co-operation of the Irish Government’.

 

The Kennedy family were represented by Eunice Shriver (John F’s sister) and her daughter Maria who was 13 years old at the time. She married Arnold Schwarzgenegger, the Governor of California. Also there was Ted Kennedy’s wife Joan.

 

The park was paid for by American citizens of Irish origin and the Irish government. The land for the park was bought from Frank Doyle who lived in Ballysop House. This house no longer stands. The park and arboretum is now controlled and run by Dúchas, The Heritage Service.

At the opening of John F.Kennedy Park by Uachtarán Éamon de Valera on May 29th 1968 were Joan Kennedy (Ted’s wife), her daughter Maria, and Eunice Shriver.

At the opening of John F.Kennedy Park by Uachtarán Éamon de Valera on May 29th 1968 were Joan Kennedy (Ted’s wife), her daughter Maria, and Eunice Shriver.

 

We in fifth and sixth class visited Kennedy Park for an educational school trip. We also visited the monuments of the 1798 Rebel Camp Sites on top of Slieve Coillte and at Ballysop. We learned a lot about the park and we hope you too will enjoy your visit there.

Some lovely flowers and shrubs at Kennedy Park

Some lovely flowers and shrubs at Kennedy Park

 

We have always liked Kennedy Park in Scoil Mhuire. It’s only over a mile from the school. We like the beautiful scenery, the lake, the wildlife and the fun playground.In order to keep the park and arboretum clean and beautiful always we have suggested these ideas:

  • Put your litter in the bins that are supplied in the different areas around the park
  • Do not vandalise the trees, shrubs or flowers
  • Keep dogs on leashes at all times.
  • Always have younger children under supervision
  • No loud noise and music or ball games as these disturb people who want peace and quiet in the park

 

Lake and stream that flows into it

Lake and stream that flows into it

 

Kennedy Park is suitable for all ages. The younger children could play in the playground and maze. They could also feed the ducks or take a trip on the pony and trap around the park. The older kids could go and visit the fountain or play in the wide open areas there. Adults could go for a stroll on the grounds or to the Visitor Centre and see a video about the park. They can also visit the tea rooms. There are also picnic tables around the park for families and well sign posted walks.

Kennedy Park is truly a great place to visit.

 

Slieve Coillte and Ballysop Ballad

The following is the first and last verses of a ballad called ‘Slieve Coillte and Ballysop’ written by the local poet, Pat Hickey from Ballykelly, who died on June 6, 1987. It was composed by Pat to mark the opening of J.F.Kennedy Park on Wednesday,May 29,1968.

 

In the Barony of Shelburne, there stands Sliabh Coillte Hill

As fortune’s wheels do turn, will be more historic still

It’s seen its day of glory, but the glorious one will be

When its top,will plant the plot,to Kennedy’s memory.

 

When this great array gets in full sway,and the visitors come o’er

What meets their gaze will them amaze the likes not seen before

God rest you John F.Kennedy, you were loved by one and all

‘Though we’ll be gone you’ll still live on,until the final trumpet calls.

Killesk Mass Rock

 

Killesk Mass Rock

Killesk Mass Rock

 

In the 18th century the cruel Penal Laws were passed in Ireland. Priests and bishops were not allowed to say mass. The people gathered together in the open at mass rocks or in safe houses. Some fields in Ireland have the name “Carraig an Aifrinn” or Mass Rock. In parts of Ireland today, especially Kerry and Cork a mass in the house is still celebrated.This is called a “Station Mass” and goes back to Penal times.

 

One of these mass rocks is in our parish at Killesk. The rock is made from granite which is a very hard rock. A section on top was cut away to make a flat altar for the priest to rest his vessels.There is a cross carved on the rock’s flat surface also.

 

Inscribed or carved cross on the altar

Inscribed or carved cross on the altar

 

The mass rock field is away from the roads and well sheltered with trees. Lookouts were posted in case the soldiers or Red Coats were coming. Mass was held in secret and the priest arrived in disguise to say mass. Mass rocks were often placed near streams so it is possible that people walked on the bed of the Pill so that they would not leave any footprints behind. The soldiers from Duncannon found the rock and rolled into the nearby river Pill.

 

Campile or Ceann Phuill means the “head” of the Pill. The rock stayed there for over 200 years. In 1973 it was put back on its base. Some locals wanted it placed in the village but the owner of the field, Janie Colfer, had it placed back in its original position. It is there to this day and mass is said each year on the Monday nearest the feast of St.James. Our parish church in Horeswood is dedicated to St.James. The first mass was said there in 1974 by Canon Anglim P.P. Horeswood.

 

Penal cross used by priests with its short arms so that it could be quickly hidden up his sleeve.

Penal cross used by priests with its short arms so that it could be quickly hidden up his sleeve.

 

The custom of placing a lighted candle on the window at Christmas is also said to come from Penal times. It was a signal to the wandering priest that it was a safe house to visit and that the family wanted to receive the sacraments. After the Penal Laws the custom continued but the candle was now used to show the Holy Family the road to Bethlehem and as a welcome to Baby Jesus into the home. The custom is still carried on in many parts of Ireland to this day at Christmas.

 

Lookouts on guard while mass is said at Mass Rock

Lookouts on guard while mass is said at Mass Rock

 

Fr.French celebrates mass at the Mass Rock July 26 2004

Fr.French celebrates mass at the Mass Rock July 26 2004

 

Drawing of the Mass rock by Isabelle C.in 4th Class

Drawing of the Mass rock by Isabelle C.in 4th Class

Kilmokea Cemetery

 

Kilmokea Cemetery

Kilmokea Cemetery

 

Kilmokea is a very ancient site in our parish. It is believed that there was a large monastery here in the sixth century covering over twenty acres. It was built on Great Island, when it was an actual island and was of great importance as the monastery controlled the River Barrow and ferry crossing to County Waterford and Kilkenny. It’s also close to Waterford Harbour. We know that the Island or Hervey’s Island, as the norman Hervey de Monte Marisco was granted the lands here, had its own town.Two stone castles were built on the Island also.

 

The rampart of the Viking fort can still be seen as can the church site and cemetery. No doubt the Vikings,when they arrived in the eight century could see how important this monastic site was. The remains of a horizontal water mill was found here in 1968 when Colonel Price was the owner and can be seen in the garden behind Kilmokea House.

 

The cemetery contains items of great historical interest and are well worth seeing.

 

Bullaun Stones

Bullaun Stones

 

These stones,called Bullaun Stones, are to be seen just inside the entrance gate.There are three of them here.They are bowl shaped and were probably used as baptismal fonts or holy water fonts. The larger one could have been used for grinding corn as a quern stone.The monks also used them to grind medicinal herbs. The fonts were from the church which was here and the remains of its outer walls can still be seen.

 

High Cross

High Cross

 

This is supposed to be the smallest high-cross to be found in Ireland. It is 56 centimetres or about two feet in height. As you can see it has a Latin cross inside the carved circle.It also has some letters carved which are difficult to make out.

 

Sacrificial Stone

Sacrificial Stone

 

This is a picture of a sacrificial stone found within the rampart. As you can see it has a bowl shaped depression for the head and a channel for the neck to lie on.It’s also called a guillotine stone and is of granite and is 26 inches in length.It could have been used to slaughter animals or humans. The celts had the custom of headhunting. This cruel custom involved beheading the enemy and taking it home as a trophy after a battle. We know too that they offered human sacrifices to their gods.

 

Base of Cross

Base of Cross

 

This stone,which is in the cemetery, is probably the base for a high-cross and is of granite. The cross itself is no longer here.

 

Head Stone

Head Stone

 

This unusual head stone has a skull and cross bones carved on it. On the back it has an inscription and the year 1739. There is a history of pirates attacking vessels on the River Barrow in this area.

 

Stone sculpture

Stone sculpture

 

This stone with a head carved is in two parts and can be seen just inside the main entrance to the cemetery.

 

If visiting Kilmokea Cemetery please respect the artefacts to be seen and that this graveyard is still in use. Thanks to Tom Kent,Loughtown,Great Island for his help. Seán Crowley.

Field Names

 

Bán ArdHigh meadow
Bán na féireGrassy meadow
Bán na hInsRiverside meadow
Carraig binnRock peak
Crickeen (cricín)Small boundary field
Garraí FadaLong garden
Gorrybe (garraí bia) Food garden
Kinabeg (Cinn Beag)Small headland
Knickeen (cnoicin)Little hill
Knock or CnocThe hill
Lacken (Leacan)Hillside
Páirc an teampaillChurch field as there was a church here long ago
Páirc an trucailField of the cart because tinkers camped here long ago
Páirc na sceachaField of the bushes
Páircín glasLittle green field. It has green circles or fairy rings in the Autumn. These are called crop marks
Parkeen Aedh (Páircín Aodh)Mogue’s Field
Rath fieldThere is rath or fort here (We have lots of fields called after raths)
The CarraigínLittle Rock
The GaiseachPlace or field of shallow water
The Faha (faiche) Lawn or playing field
The moochawn (múchán)Heap of stones in the middle of field

R.I.C Barracks at Ballybrazil

 

Front of Barracks showing arched windows

Front of Barracks showing arched windows

Burning Barracks (Click to play)

About a half mile from our school is the remains of an old RIC barracks. RIC stands for Royal Irish Constabulary and was the police force before the present Garda Síochána were founded in 1922. Queen Victoria is supposed to have added the word “Royal” in 1867 for their loyalty in putting down the Fenian Rising.The barracks is on the land of local man,Jimmy Murphy.The RIC policemen were mostly catholic but in time were hated as they were sent to help the bailiffs evict Irish tenants. This happened in nearby Foley’s Fort in 1887 and Coolroe in 1888.

 

The building was originally a farm house belonging to a family called Sheil who were protestant. They sold the house to Larry Murphy of the shop and he leased it to the RIC. The RIC then moved from Whitechurch to this barracks in Ballybrazil. A Sergeant John Meade was stationed there on the 16th August 1888 as he was involved in the nearby eviction in Coolroe, Ballycullane.

 

Rear view of Barracks

Rear view of Barracks

 

Matty Ryan’s father (the Quay New Ross),was a constable here up until the War of Independence(1919-1921). He left the force when his friend was killed by the Black and Tans.This happened when he was on leave at home in Co.Offaly and was attending mass with his friend who was blessing himself at the church font when he was shot.

 

The Barracks was burned down on May12th 1920 at the height of the War of Independence. 1920 was called “The year of the Terror” as it was the year the dreaded Black and Tans came to Ireland. RIC barracks were burnt by the IRA all over the country and Martial Law was declared by the English in Wexford and other counties. Lots of RIC men resigned at this time when they saw the slaughter of the Tans and also they would have known the IRA men.

 

Most RIC barracks in the countryside were being deserted and the RIC moved into the towns and fortified these barracks in case of attack. The IRA attacked the barracks looking for guns and to destroy England’s control of Ireland. When a barracks was abandoned, it too was burned to prevent the RIC from returning there.

The IRA men involved in the burning were all from New Ross town.There were thirteen men in all. It happened on Saturday May 12th 1920. Sergeant Flynn and his family were living there at the time. The family was made up of his wife,three sons and a daughter called Rose.

 

On arrival the IRA first removed all the furniture and possessions of the Flynn’s from the building and were said to be coureteous to the family.They then sprinkled petrol onto straw and scattered the straw on the slated roof. It was then set alight. A military lorry arrived the next day and took the family and their belongings.

 

It is believed they went to Limerick. The RIC then moved to Hart’s pub in Campile. The new Garda Síochána were also based there until the new station was built in 1927. The first sergeant there was Sgt.M.Scanlon and the last sergeant was Galwayman,Pat Fogarty. It’s not surprising that people still refer to the Garda Station as the “barracks”.

 

Thanks to Tommy Grennan(Ballykerogue) for the information

 

Shelburne Co-op

 

Shelbourne Co-Op in all its glory 2003

Shelbourne Co-Op in all its glory 2003

 

In our village the building that stands out the most is the CO-OP.It’s full name is Shelburne Co-operative Agricultural society. It also has a great history and now with Glanbia it continues to do well. The name Shelburne or the old name Síl mBrain is the name of the Barony in which Campile is situated. The Co-Op has been described as a ‘mighty oak’ by a local poet and since it was started in 1919 that tiny oak has continued to grow.

 

The Co-Operative movement had been founded earlier in the 1890′s by Sir Horace Plunkett. Michael Cloney from Dungulph and Simon Murphy from Ramsgrange came together and decided to help the local farmers to sell their produce. Before this a farmer might have travelled a long journey with his corn only to be told ‘We are not taking any corn to day. Come back some other day’. The aim of the Co-Op was to buy everything the farmer has to sell and to sell and selling everything he has to buy and sharing in the profits.

 

Michael Cloney Chairman 1919-1934

Michael Cloney Chairman 1919-1934

 

Simon Murphy General Manager/Secretary 1919-1955

Simon Murphy General Manager/Secretary 1919-1955

 

These two men were involved from the start as was Martin Howlett from Dunbrody who was the Co-Op’s first manager. He won four All Ireland Football medals with Wexford from 1915-1918.

 

Samuel G. Warren. Chairman 1952-55

Samuel G. Warren. Chairman 1952-55

 

In the beginning the Co-Op idea was supported by most but others said it would be a failure. It started its life in a wooden shed 40 feet by 20 feet on an acre of ground bought by the founders. The first shareholder was Michael Doyle from Fethard-on-Sea who bought 10 shares on may 26 1919. This was also the time when the Irish War of Independence 1919-1921 started.The turnover for the first year was £3,013.

 

View of the Co-Op from by gone days

View of the Co-Op from by gone days

 

In the early days it would have had a saddler’s shop, cobbler’s, grocery, butchery, creamery and bakery. It also had a pharmacy and hardware as well as its own restaurant. A ‘Bonus Scheme’ was set up so that members and customers would gain from the profits. It would be paid in cash or goods. The wool bonus and turkey bonus were very popular.The Co-Op also had its own boat or barge which was built by the members themselves and that’s how Paddy Carroll of Ballyhack got involved in boat building.The boat travelled to and from Waterford with coal,cement,and other goods. It was able to come right into the centre of Campile village on the Pill river. The railway of course was nearby. In 1959 the Co-Op built a modern grain drying plant with an output of 5,000 barrels a day.Once, over 140 workers headed home on their bikes after a day’s work there.

 

Barge on the River Pill.The Co-Op barge was engine powered and drew grain from Campile to Halls in Waterford and is seen here at Dunphy's coalyard.Included in picture are Mikey Shalloe and Larry Dillon.

Barge on the River Pill.The Co-Op barge was engine powered and drew grain from Campile to Halls in Waterford and is seen here at Dunphy's coalyard.Included in picture are Mikey Shalloe and Larry Dillon.

 

Bailing wool for export at the Co-Op in the 50's.From Left. Walter Kinsella, Peter Kehoe,Tim Sullivan and  Sim Murphy from Curraduff

Bailing wool for export at the Co-Op in the 50's.From Left. Walter Kinsella, Peter Kehoe,Tim Sullivan and Sim Murphy from Curraduff

 

Disaster struck on 26th August 1940 during World War 2 when a German plane dropped over five bombs. Three girls were killed in the C0-Op restaurant and the creamery and other buildings were destroyed. The Co-Op had to be re built and today is still thriving.

 

Delivering grain to the Co-Op 1950s

Delivering grain to the Co-Op 1950s

 

Question Time ' was sponsored by the Co-Op.The The 1959 finalists were Campile and Adamstown(winners)

Question Time ' was sponsored by the Co-Op.The The 1959 finalists were Campile and Adamstown(winners)

 

Campile team.

Back Row.Brian Barnwell, John Murphy,Michael Hart,Harold Warren and Michael Sutton.

Front Row third left is Mr.Simon Murphy

Slieve Coillte in 1798

 

This monument on Slieve Coillte was unveiled on April 26 1998 by the local Comóradh Group as part of the Bicentenary Commemorations.

This monument on Slieve Coillte was unveiled on April 26 1998 by the local Comóradh Group as part of the Bicentenary Commemorations.

 

On the top of Slieve Coillte there is a monument that says – “The rebels camped on Slieve Coillte from the 7th to the 10th June 1798. Bagenal Harvey resigned his command here. He was succeeded by Fr.Philip Roche. A de-tachment under the command of Thomas Cloney attacked the gunboats on the River Barrow at Fisherstown.”

 

The following is the full story of what happened.

 

Slieve Coillte was picked because of the excellent view of the other camps in Wexford such as Lacken Hill,Carrigbyrne Hill, Forth Mountain and Oulart Hill. It is about 3 miles from Scoil Mhuire and you can see several counties from its summit such as Waterford,Carlow Kilkenny and Tipperary. It is 888 feet in height.

 

Camp Sites near New Ross (by Rory O'H.)

Camp Sites near New Ross (by Rory O'H.)

 

After the Battle of Ross on June 5th 1798, which the rebels lost, they moved to a camp on Slieve Coillte from Carrigbyrne Hill.The headquarters of the rebels was Ballysop House. Lookouts were posted on top of Sliabh Coillte to watch the River Barrow and the road for the enemy. The rebels camped on Sliabh Coillte,on its side and around Ballysop House.

 

Thomas Cloney was on his way to visit the Sweetmans in Newbawn one night and found his lookouts had “skulked down from the camp at the approach of night. He also took the horse and guns from Miles Doyle of Arnestown as the rebels were short of firepower.

 

Monument at Ballysop which was unveiled on August 23rd 1998

Monument at Ballysop which was unveiled on August 23rd 1998

 

On the above is written

 

“It was at Sliabh Coillte our pikes were reeking”.

 

Alas,this was not true. Beauchamp Bagenal Harvey,who was leader of the Southern Army, resigned at Sliabh Coillte.

 

Some say he was disgusted at what happened in a place called Scullabogue which is near to New Ross town. Here, over 100 loyalists,including children,were either burned,shot or piked to death in a shed. It was revenge for the rebel defeat at Ross.

 

Others say Harvey proved to be a poor leader at the Battle of Ross and blamed him for their defeat. Fr.Philip Roche, who was a curate in Poulpeasty, took over as Commander of the rebels on Sliabh Coillte. He often said mass for the rebel army and gave them scapulars. He also gave letters of protection to loyalists so that they wouldn’t be killed. The rebels stayed on Sliabh Coillte from 7th to the 10th June.

 

A 1798 camp scene

A 1798 camp scene

 

While camped on Sliabh Coillte, the rebels noticed three English gunboats sailing down the Barrow. This was June 10th.

 

Thomas Cloney from Moneyhore and some rebels attacked the boats. Two got away but they captured the “Louisa” and shot its pilot. They found no guns or ammunition but letters dispatches (messages) saying how they had the rebels defeated in every battle. The pilot or midshipman was Robert Heyland,aged 36 years and is buried in St.Mary’s cemetery New Ross.

 

Some rebels read about their own deaths, to their great amusement. After Sliabh Coillte the rebels moved to Lacken Hill to plan a second attack on New Ross. They were very short on ammunition and so Thomas Cloney decided to attack Borris House in Borris Co. Carlow.

 

From Lacken Hill Fr. Roche wrote a letter to Fr. James Doyle P.P. of Sutton’s Parish (Horeswood). He wasn’t very happy with the men from the parish. This was June 14th. The letter reads as follows:

 

“Revd.Sir,

 

You are hereby ordered in conjunction with Edmund Walsh to order all your parishioners to the camp on Lacken Hill under pain of the must severe punishment ; for I declare to you and to them in the name of the people,if you do not,that I will censure Sutton’s Parish with fire and sword. Come and see me this day.

 

Lacken Hill, June 14th, 1798. ROCHE.”

To the Revd. James Doyle.

 

We are told that his orders were obeyed. After the 1798 Rising Fr.Doyle was tried for being on Lacken Hill. He produced the letter and so was let go free. Fr.Roche was later tortured and hanged on Wexford Bridge while trying to make peace.

 

Ballysop House which was the HQ of the rebels when they camped at Sliabh Coillte. It was demolished in 1965.

Ballysop House which was the HQ of the rebels when they camped at Sliabh Coillte. It was demolished in 1965.

 

Looking for Help

 

Rev.William Glascott rector of Killesk and St.James’ warned his parishioners of the coming Battle of Ross and some of the protestants left for Duncannon Fort and Passage to seek protection.

 

Landowner Francis Glascott of Piltown wrote to Bagenal Harvey seeking to protect his property. Harvey replied that he could scarcely protect himself and had little control of the rebels since the defeat at Ross and the shooting of Matthew Furlong with a flag of peace.One of the protestants shot at the massacre in Scullabogue after the Battle of Ross on June 5th, was a Philip Hornick who was a steward to John Glascott of Alderton.

 

The above is based on a project done by the ’97/ ’98 fifth class for a project organised by Mick Walsh of the Horeswood Comóradh ’98. They won some books based on the ’98 Rising

Irish Words

 

The following words would be familiar to the older people in the parish and some are still used.

 

Word / PhraseMeaning
a leana cúra (a leanbh cumhra)!my fragrant child - sweet smelling
a leanbh! mo chumhra bán!child! my beloved fragrance
a mhic!my son
a stór!my treasure!
ainnismiserable (sick person, not well)
amadána fool
baitín (bateen)strong stick or baton
banbhbonham or piglet
bastún (bostoon)an ignorant kind of person
bean sí- banshee a fairy woman, also called the ‘bow’
beart (of hay, straw etc)bundle carried on back
bia! bia (bee,bee)calling turkeys (food!)
bogánsoft shelled egg
bóithrín (boreen)little road (from bóthar which means cow pass)
botún to make a botún (a mistake)
brosna (brusna)armful of sticks,firewood
brus dust (bits of straw) (bruscar)
buachalán buírag wort, noxious weed also ‘geosadán’
buaile a ‘booley’ (milking place)
cáibín (caubeen)an old hat
caoineadh (keening)crying at a wake long ago
cíléir (keeler)shallow wooden vessel where milk ‘set’ in during churning, a cream tub,-cream was then skimmed
ciotóg left-handed person
cipín little stick
cis (pronounced ‘kish’)a basket (from ciseán)
créatúr (craythur)a person to be pitied
crúibín pig’s foot
doirnín (a durneen)or dúirnínone of the two grips on a scythe
dromán (drumawn)strap on horse’s back when ploughing
dúidín (dudeen)short stemmed pipe (usually refers to a clay pipe)
flaithiúlacht a generous person
gabhlóg fork shaped stick used for cutting bushes with a sickle
gaisce a deed
gasúr (gorsoon)young boy
geansaí a jersey
giorróg (gearróg)short drill or furrow
gog (goggy)boiled egg
grafán hoe, grubber
gríosach (greesock)ashes with small burning coals or embers
gruamach glum, sour person
losaid (losset)wooden trough for kneading dough
lúbán twisted or bent out of shape
ludramán a lazy, idle fellow
lúidín the little finger
marla clay(marl), plasticine
meas respect, ‘I have great meas on him’
megín covering for a sore finger made from calico and tied at wrist- from ‘méirin’-the little finger
óinseach a foolish (woman)
olagón wail
pincín (pinkeen)a minnow
piseog superstition
plámás flattery
poitín(poteen)illicit whiskey
práiscín an apron made from hemp bag
praiseach a harmful weed (charlock), to break in pieces
pus lips, mouth
ráiméis nonsense, foolish talk
ráth a rath, a fort:ráithín (raheen) a little fort
sceach thorn bush
scealp a skelp, a blow
sciollán (skillaun)seed potato
scráib (scraub)a scrape or scratch
scríd a screed, a rag. ‘I didn’t have a screed to wear to the dance’.
searús bitter person, sour
seilchide (sealakipuka)a snail (seilide)
sí gí (si gaoithe)whirlwind (fairy wind) (sigín- little whirlwind)
sibín (shebeen)illicit ‘ale’ house (there was one in Ballybrazil)
slane (sleán)turf spade
slibhín(sleveen)a sly, sneaky fellow
smithiríní (smithereens)broken in small pieces
soc sock or share of a plough
sop a wisp,a handful of hay
stibhín (stiveen)stick for making holes- a dibble
stillín (stellan)a stillion, shelf in kitchen for buckets of water, keelers
straoill an untidy person
súgán hay or straw rope
taobhín a patch on a boot or shoe
taoscán (tay-us-kan)a right taoscán (of drink)- a good quantity
tioc!tioc!calling hens and chickens
tráithnín (trawneen)a strong blade of grass

Horeswood Townlands

Bailte Fearainn Coill de hÓra-Horeswood Townlands

Name of TownlandIrish NameMeaning(Probable)
Aclare (Aughclare) Áth an ChláirFord of the plank
BallybrazilBaile Uí Bhreasáil Townland of the son of Brazil
BallyfarnogueBaile FearnógTownland of the alder (Aldertown or Alderton)
BallinamonaBaile na Móna Land of the turf
BallykerogueBaile CiarógKeerock’s Land
BallysopBaile na SopTownland of the Wisps
Ballinteskin WaterBaile an t-uisce finntown of the clear or Springwell Town
BallykellyBaile Uí CheallaighKelly’s Town
BallyedockBaile ÉadocEdock’s town( Edock was a christian name among some of the Kavanaghs here)
BallyveligBaile Uí BhéiligVelick’s Town
BallyverogueBaile Uí BhearógO’Barrog’s or Varrock’s town
CamblinCam GhlinnWinding Valley or glen
CampileCeann an Phuill Head or point of the Pill river
CarrowanreeCeathrú an Rí The King’s Quarter
Curraghduff An Currach DubhThe black moor or bog
CoolerinCúil ErinErin’s corner ?
DunbrodyDún BróithBrody’s Fortress
Dunganstown Baile Uí DhonnagáinDungan’s Town
FisherstownBaile na nIascairíPlace of Fishing ?
GrangeAn GhráinseachThe Granary
Great IslandAn tOileán Móralso known as Durbard's and Hervey’s Island
HoreswoodCoill de hÓraHore’s Wood
Killowen Cill EoinSt.John’s Church
KilleskCill UisceChurch near the water
KilmannockCill na ManachChurch of the Monks
KilmokeaCill Mac AodhMac Aodh’s (Hugh's church) or Mogue’s Church
KnockeaCnoc AodhHugh’s Hill
MilltownBaile an Mhuilinn
OldcourtAn tSeana Cúirt David Sutton had a castle here
PoulmaloePoll Ó MhaolmhuaidhMolloy’s inlet
PriesthaggardÍothlann an tSagairtwas also written as Price Haggard and Priest Town.
SaltmillsMuileann an tSáileTidal Mill used by Abbey monks.
Sliabh CoillteWooded Mountain
StokestownBaile Ui StocaíMan’s name ?
TinnockTigh an Chnoic Hill House
WhitechurchAn Teampall Gealspelt also as 'Temple Gale' in old maps'

 

Ref: “The Origins and History of Irish Names of Places” by P.W.Joyce 1910-1913

 

Seán Crowley Aug.04

 

Note: Some of the meanings are doubtful. Please email smcampile.ias@eircom.net with suggestions.

 

Warrens of Whitechurch

 

Sam Warren on the windcharger.

Sam Warren on the windcharger.

 

This unusual photo shows Sam Warren on top of the windcharger. The Warrens were away ahead of their time in generating their own electricity. It was built by Sam himself but neither the tower nor windcharger are still there.

The Warren family of Whitechurch was a very hard working and enterprising family and gave much needed employment to the locals. They were involved in many enterprises especially in the early to mid 1900′s.

One of their main enterprises was the ‘Piltown Bacon Company’. This company was bought from the Glascott family in Piltown who were landlords of Whitechurch.

Two workmen and a butcher moved to the Warren Farm and Mary and Katie McDonald began working here also at this time. The pigs were reared, slaughtered, cleaned cut up and prepared to be sold. The bacon was cured in a large vat and then hung from large hooks in the beams of the ‘Bacon House’.

The bacon was then loaded into their own van and sold to the local houses and shops.

Sausages and puddings were also made here. The left overs from the pigs were minced and mixed with ‘rough meal’. which was brought down from Dublin. Spices were then added. The skins for the sausages were made from the intestines of sheep which were collected from the local area on the van run. The puddings were made in a similar way.

 

Maggie Dake, Willie Dwyer and Katie McDonald outside the 'Sausage House'.

Maggie Dake, Willie Dwyer and Katie McDonald outside the 'Sausage House'.

 

Sam is sitting on the wing of the van which was used in the 30's and 40's.

Sam is sitting on the wing of the van which was used in the 30's and 40's.

 

Candles were another product from the pig. These were made from pig fat (tallow) which was poured into moulds with wicks supplied by ‘Irish Ropes’. The candles were also sold on the van round. A common problem with the candles was that cats loved the smell and taste of the pig’s fat and would often run away with candles. Up to twelve women were involved in the candle making and the sausage business.

Sweets were also made here. First of all sugar was boiled until a certain texture was reached. The temperature could be as high as 140 °C. They made boiled sweets,’rock’ and ‘peggy’s leg’. They also imported boiled sweets from Czechoslovakia which were brought in at Dungarvan and collected in the van. The sweets were sold in the van with the meat and candles.

 

Patricia Knight shows the thermometer used in the making of the boiled sweets.

Patricia Knight shows the thermometer used in the making of the boiled sweets.

 

With the coming of World War 2 in 1939 there was a great shortage of tea. Sam Warren and Nellie Doyle were delivering their produce in Taghmon one evening when they stopped for dinner. They were given tea with their meal and then asked for the recipe. Back at Whitechurch they started to experiment that night. The tea was made from carrots minced in the sausage machine which was then put into 44 gallon drums and roasted over a saw-dust fire. The tea was then put into brown bags which were easily found then and were labelled and then sold.. The tea experiment proved a great success.

 

At its peak some 20 people were employed on the farm just for the ‘Piltown Bacon Company’ work.

After the war new laws were brought in regarding slaughter houses and the meat business changed. Pigs were still bred on the farm but the Piltown Bacon Company became a confectionery business with Sam and Nellie working into old age.

 

Warrens Hub Cap

 

Tub Trap and above is a hubcap which was used on the traps. These cost £42.10

Tub Trap and above is a hubcap which was used on the traps. These cost £42.10

 

The Warrens were also involved in coach building and making farm trailers.

 

They also had their own forge.

This photo is from 1898 and shows-from left- Samuel George Warren,  Samuel Warren, Wilhemina Warren and Mrs. Dunne in the background. This is the original Warren house in Whitechurch.

This photo is from 1898 and shows-from left- Samuel George Warren, Samuel Warren, Wilhemina Warren and Mrs. Dunne in the background. This is the original Warren house in Whitechurch.

 

This is the house today. Roger and Patricia Knight (nee Warren) carry on a thriving self catering business called Warren Farm Guest Cottages. There are five cottages in all to choose from.

This is the house today. Roger and Patricia Knight (nee Warren) carry on a thriving self catering business called Warren Farm Guest Cottages. There are five cottages in all to choose from.

 

http://www.warrenfarmireland.com/

 

I wish to thank Patricia Knight most sincerely for allowing me take photos and giving me every assistance.
Please note that the house is a private residence.
Seán Crowley

Whitechurch Stone Row

 

Stone Row

Stone Row

 

Another great pre-historic find was made at Whitechurch. A fine example of three standing stones can be seen here. This is known as a stone row.The stones are found on the property of Séamus Kane and are granite stones Their heights are 1m25cm, 1m40cm and the tallest is 1m70cm.

 

These stones are from the Bronze Age. Sometimes the stone is alone and is called a Standing Stone. They can also be in a circle called a Stone Circle. It’s possible that these three in Whitechurch could have been part of a Stone Circle.

 

These stone rows and circles were sacred places and were places where some religious ceremony was performed or to mark the location of a burial place. Whitechurch,or an Teampall Geal got its name from the time the White Monks lived here as they wore white robes. There was a celtic monastery here,which was dedicated to St.Abban in the 7th century.