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Kilmannock House

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Kilmannock House

Kilmannock House

 

Kilmannock House was built in 1780 by Henry Thomas Haughton. Other occupiers were David Hewitson and M.W Knox. Capt. Samuel Barrett-Hamilton lived here from 1860 until 1921.

The ‘Barrett ‘ family coat of arms can be seen on the gable end of Clancy’s house at the entrance to the house. A self -portrait of Charlotte Barrett-Hamilton, who was a daughter of the landlord, can be seen inside. She is the ‘lady in blue’. Coursing was a very popular pastime with Barrett-Hamilton and a fine coursing ground was found here.

Hare Coursing and hunting were very popular in our parish. Kilmannock was one of the main coursing places in Ireland. The last meeting took place in 1827. Coursing also took place in Campile from 1930-1933. Bill Power from Ballinamona used sleep in a tent looking after the hares. The field was called Grennan’s Hare Field.

The following is taken from ‘Bassett’s Directory of County Wexford’ Published in 1885.

‘The Kilmannock Coursing Club holds two meetings a year. The first meeting takes place in April and the second one in October. Captain Samuel Barrett is President and Laurence Murphy of Ballykerogue is Secretary and Treasurer. There are 25 members.

The Captain takes great interest in coursing, but does not engage in it with his own dogs. The coursing ground is about 400 acres in extent and of its size is considered to be one of the best in Ireland. It takes in the estate of Captain Barrett’.

 

Barrett Hamilton Crest

Barrett Hamilton Crest

Charlotte Barrett Hamilton Self-Portrait

Charlotte Barrett Hamilton Self-Portrait

 

 

In 1921 the estate, of up to 800 acres, was divided into five farms of 150 acres and two small farms of 25 acres. Major John Barnwell bought Kilmannock House and 150 acres. His father was a wheelwright in Co.Offaly. John had a distinguished army career in the Great War 1914-18.

He joined the army at Crinkle Barracks in Birr. In 1911 he was posted to India. When World War 1 started in 1914 he was sent back to Crinkle Barracks to train volunteers. He fought with the Leinster Regiment in the brutal campaign of Gallipoli and other parts of Eastern Europe. He was in the Machine Gun Corps and won the Military Cross medal in 1918. and the DSO (Distinguished Service Order). He met with Lawrence of Arabia in the Middle East. After the war John returned to Crinkle Barracks and was in charge of the garrison there from 1919 until 1922.

The barracks was burned by the I.R.A in 1922 and John’s regiment was disbanded. His son Desmond, who was sergeant in the Enniskillen Dragoons, was killed in Tunisia in 1942 during World War 2.

Major John died in 1976 at 91 years and his son Brian and wife Elizabeth, who reared a family of eight children, took over. Brian passed away in 1998 and his son Patrick and Edel took over the house.

 

Major Barnwell

Major Barnwell

Des Barnwell

Des Barnwell

The Late Major John Barnwell

The Late Major John Barnwell

 

Kilmannock is a grand three storey house with a basement.  The second and third storeys have a tripartite window in the centre.

The fine porch was added later. The drawing room has a lovely Carrera marble fireplace and beautiful mouldings on the ceiling. The pitch pine stairs stands out also.

In the reception room can be seen the Belfast stove which burned from October to April and heated the whole house.

In all there are 28 apartments and 14 bedrooms in Kilmannock House. The basement was the servants quarters and they had a separate stairs. Each room had its own bell to ring for service. In the basement, the wine cellar, fine open fireplace, bells for room service and the ‘dumb waiter’ can be seen.

This waiter was a lift for carrying meals to the upstairs rooms.

 

 

Belfast Stove

Belfast Stove

 

Dumb Waiter

Dumb Waiter

 

A secret tunnel can also be seen here which was probably used for hiding valuables. A water wheel was used to pump water from a well to a large tank on the roof.

The Barnwell family are to be thanked for the restoration work carried out on this magnificent house as its upkeep is costly and they make excellent hosts for their guesthouse!

 

 

Regiment Banner

The Leinster Regiment banner is a fine piece of tapestry which can be seen in the house

 

Bells

Bells in the basement

 

Wine Cellar

Wine Cellar

 

Open Fireplace

Open Fireplace

Fruithill House

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Fruithill House

Fruithill House

 

Fruit Hill was part of the Glascott estate which included Alderton (Ballyfarnogue) and Killowen. Whitechurch was called the Glascott Estate in the 1800′s. George Glascott, who was a grandson of the original William Glascott of Alderton, bought the townland of Ballinamóna in 1746. Fruit hill is part of this townland. It passed down to his grandson who was also George. This George had no sons but daughters. They had no children.When Juliana died in 1885 Fruit Hill passed on to her cousin Gerald Annesly Glascott. Gerald died on a steamship in the Suez Canal in 1909.His estate at Fruit Hill, of over 148 acres, went to his brother John. He died in 1938. The Glascott graves can be seen in Whitechurch cemetery and the gravestone inscrpitions are worth reading.

William Kirby came to work in Fruit Hill around 1903 and was granted the house and seven acres by the Land Commission. It was costly for him to maintain the house and so he moved to the nearby coach house. His son Ned lived here for over thirty years and sold the entire property around 1965. He passed away in 2000.

The house is now owned by Richard and Susan Devane and they are doing a great job in restoring it to its former glory and we wish them well. Up to a few years ago the house was in ruins.

Showing the restoration work on Fruit Hill

Showing the restoration work on Fruit Hill

 

Lovely stone work at rear of house (Aug.04)

Lovely stone work at rear of house (Aug.04)

 

The house is a three storey with no basement. It has lovely dormer windows with a venetian window in the front.

5th Class had a very enjoyable to Fruit Hill House on 7th June 2013. Click to enlarge photo.

 

Kilmokea House and Gardens

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Kilmokea House

Kilmokea House

 

Kilmokea House was built in 1794 as a church rectory for Whitechurch by Rev.Cubit Rector of Whitechurch. The last Rector living here was Rev.Greer who was drowned while swimming in Tramore and the house was sold in 1937. The Church of Ireland then sold the house and land to Mrs.Isobel Smith in 1937 and in 1947 it was sold to Mr.David Price. It was Mr.Price who built up the the seven acres of magnificent gardens with hundreds of different species of plants from all over the world.He was also a great horse breeder and was involved with the Wexford Hunt. It was Mr. and Mrs.Price who in 1947 began restoring the house to its former glory.Colonel Price who served in the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars died in 1994 and in 1997 the property was sold to Mark and Emma Hewlett. They have done great work in restoring the house, gardens and coach house. Large numbers visit the gardens each year which were opened to the public in 1998.

Kilmokea House Flora

Kilmokea House Flora

 

The garden lake

The garden lake

 

Kilmokea Duck Pond

Kilmokea Duck Pond

 

Take a break in the Literary Corner

Take a break in the Literary Corner

 

A mill stone and flume was found here in 1968 when excavating the lake. Kilmokea is a fine Georgian House with two storeys and a basement. It has a single chimney stack. Kilmokea House, though a private house is a member of the ‘Hidden Ireland’ and a great tourist attraction. It has lovely garden walks and a restaurant and craft shop in the conservatory.Guests have fine views of the garden in this peaceful haven.

 

Chinese or Yin-Yang garden

Chinese or Yin-Yang garden

 

Killowen House

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Killowen House

Killowen House

 

Killowen is a two storey Georgian house overlooking the River Barrow. There are two Wyatt windows at the ends of the first storey.These are rectangular triple windows. There is a lovely wooded driveway to the house.

George Glascott bought Killowen estate from the Earl of Anglesey in 1725 and left it to his son John Glascott. The Glascott estate included Alderton,Fruit Hill and Killowen. John was a Captain in the Wexford Militia in 1798. When Captain Glascott died his eldest son John took over Killowen. He was a barrister. John was succeeded by his son John Henry in 1857. Ten years later the estate was sold. There have been different owners since then.

A member of the Tottenham family married a Glascott and lived in Killowen in the 1930′s. This Mrs Tottenham was the first passenger in Andrew Boland’s New Ford Model A saloon car used as a hackney car. Bolands,from Whitechurch have been in the Motor Trade since 1923. Another occupier was Mrs.Marie Elena,known as ‘Mecha Cazalet’.In the late 70′s Killowen was bought by the present owner Michael Ryan, the R.T.E journalist and presenter of ‘Nationwide’.

Killowen has seven bedrooms,two of which are self-contained apartments, and four main reception rooms. It also has a ballroom.

 

Entrance to Killown House

Entrance to Killown House

 

Ballysop House

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Ballysop House

Ballysop House

 

Ballysop House, sadly, is no longer standing. It was demolished in 1965 to make way for John F.Kennedy Arboretum and Park which was opened on May 29th 1968. In 1798 it was the headquarters of the rebels when they camped at Slieve Coillte from June7th -10th.Two monkey puzzle trees grow where the house once stood.

Jasper Gifford emigrated from England to Ireland, initially to Dublin where Burke’s Landed Gentry notes that he “purchased, by deed, dated 20 July 1661, the lands of Polemaloe (now called Pilltown), Whitechurch, and Ballykelly, Co. Wexford”. He settled in Polemaloe. His son William sold his estate to his son-in-law, George Glascott.

In 1837 Rev.William Gifford lived here. The Giffords and the Glascotts were related by marriage and were the main landlords in the parish. In 1876 Nicholas Gifford owned 1,891 acres at Ballysop.

 

Ballysop Estate

Ballysop Estate

 

Above is an extract from Griffiths Valuation 1853 showing the tenants who rented land from Rev.William Gifford at Ballysop.The area covers over 353 acres. He also owned the townlands of Aclare, Ballybrazil, Curraghduff and Ballymaclare.

Ballsop House was a fine house with a drawing room, diningroom,large hall, bathroom, bedrooms, pantries and servants’ apartments. Outside was a coach house and stables for six horses and a lovely garden.

Frank Doyle bought the house from the Rice family after he sold Dunmain House and farm to the Conway family in 1917. He was a brother to Major Doyle who owned Brandon House Hotel. Frank, a bachelor, had up to eight workers employed on the farm and in the house. Jimmy O’Brien, Ballsop, was the ploughman. Paddy Mac Donnell, New Ross, was a general farmhand. Johnny Kehoe, Ballybrazil, was the herdsman. Stephen Kehoe, The Mountain, was another general farmhand. Jimmy O’Brien Jnr.,Ballysop was the chauffeur. The cooks and house keepers were Eileen and Bridie Ryan from Dunbrody and Maura McCarthy, Yoletown.

Frank’s two sisters lived with him in Ballysop. Mona and Babe remained spinsters. Frank was keen sportsman and won many golf trophies. He was also a keen gamesman and provided much of the fowl for the dinners at Ballysop House. He retired to Fethard after selling Ballysop to the Land Commission in the early sixties.

 

Mary Ann and Josie Ryan of Dunganstown at Ballysop House in 1963

Mary Ann and Josie Ryan of Dunganstown at Ballysop House in 1963

 

The following is part of the debate in Dáil Éireann, Dec.10,1964 between the Wexford TD, Sir Anthony Esmonde and Mr.Moran the then Minister for Lands on the demolition of Ballysop House.

Mr.Esmonde:

“They have taken over Ballysop estate. I am informed that the original house—Ballysop House, built about 120 years ago is to be demolished and in its place a modern structure is to be erected. I have made representations to the Minister’s Department on this subject, but somebody—some architect, some planner or somebody within the Civil Service itself acting on the direction of the Minister—has decided this building must go.

 

There is very strong feeling in Wexford on this subject. I am voicing the opinion of my constituents that this house should be allowed to stand. The Forestry Division say: “We must demolish this house if we are to build a suitable college or whatever will be there.” Further representation has been made to me that as this memorial is associated with the Kennedy family, who are very interested in the problem of retarded children, the house should be left where it is and used for the care of such children. There are plenty of rooms in it and it is on a beautiful site overlooking the mountains. The reason I am making this plea to the Minister is that the Kennedy family are perhaps the greatest supporters and helpers of organisations for retarded children. It would be a fitting memorial if this house were left for that purpose. It is a fine house and it would cost thousands to build its like today.

 

I know that what is known as a policy decision has been taken by the Department that this house must be swept away. I am trying to urge on behalf of my constituents, on behalf of public opinion in Wexford for which I am qualified to speak, that the Minister should seriously take another look at this. I only hope the bulldozers have not already been sent down to perpetrate what I consider would be an outrage on this fine old Wexford residence.”

Mr.Moran:

“Deputy Esmonde referred to an old house, the location of which is earmarked as the site for the administration building to be erected in connection with the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Memorial Park in Wexford. I have seen it and, in my judgment, firstly, it is in a hopeless state of repair and would cost a fortune to do anything with it, and secondly, it would be completely unsuitable for the purpose for which Deputy Esmonde suggested it could be used. It would be unsuitable to house the people Deputy Esmonde suggested it should house, being beside the administration building in this Memorial Park and beside the new agricultural school being erected on that site. I am advised by those who are competent to judge these matters that the cheapest and best thing to do is to knock it down. Even if the building itself were suitable, for the reasons I have given—location and so forth—it would certainly not be suitable to house the type of people the Deputy suggested.”

Well known Ballysop man, George Harrell, who passed away in October 07 aged 97. George lived near the Kennedy Park entrance and was a keen gardener and card player. He was also an avid bee keeper and one time shopkeeper.

Well known Ballysop man, George Harrell, who passed away in October 07 aged 97. George lived near the Kennedy Park entrance and was a keen gardener and card player. He was also an avid bee keeper and one time shopkeeper.

 

U.S plane crashes in Ballsop, Feb 5th 1943.

This is a photograph of the American Airacobra which is similar to the one that crash-landed in Ballysop in Feb. 5th 1943.

This is a photograph of the American Airacobra which is similar to the one that crash-landed in Ballysop in Feb. 5th 1943.

 

Not only was Campile bombed during World War 2 but an American fighter airplane called the Airacobra crashed landed in Ballysop. It crashed in Frank Doyle’s field called the ‘Long Run’ where he used train horses. The first people to arrive at the scene of the crash were Frank and George Harrell. The crash happened at 2pm and the plane travelled about thirty feet before coming to rest. The pilot was uninjured and was brought to Ballysop House for a meal. The plane was later dismantled and taken to Baldonnel. The Airacobra was on way to Africa but was separated from the other aircraft due to bad weather in the Bay of Biscay. The pilot attempted to return to England but lost his way and had to crash land in Ballysop.

Alderton House

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Alderton House

Alderton House

 

The main seat or home of the Glascott family was at Alderton House. It was also called Piltown House. The other Glascott houses were Fruithill and Killowen. The original Alderton House was situated near Alderton Castle. The castle ruins are still to be seen. The Glascotts settled in the townland of Ballyfarnogue or Baile Fearnóg. This translates into the Home of the Alder or as it became known- Aldertown or Alderton.

The house was built around 1820. It is a two storey with a high roof. The main entrance is at the gable end. The porch was erected by the Cairns family who are the present owners. It has two bow (projecting) windows. The bow window over the entrance porch is a ‘blind’ window. The other one is at the drawing room. There is a stewards house at the back and fine gardens.

 

Valuation of Ballyfarnogue Estate

Valuation of Ballyfarnogue Estate

 

The above shows part of the Glascott estate in Ballyfarnogue totalling 264 acres and is taken from Griffith’s Valuation 1853.

The Glascotts originated in Aldersgate, London. William Glascott landed in Youghal Co.Cork in 1650 with a troop of horse to fight for Cromwell. By way of payment he received lands in Ballykelly in the Parish of Whitechurch-taken from Arthur Keating,-at Oldcourt and at Ballyfarnogue or Aldertown. The Oldcourt lands were taken from David Sutton.

William was succeeded by his son John Glascott who added the lands of Knockea and Killesk to the estate. Alderton was next taken over by John’s son George Glascott who married Anne Gifford the daughter of William Gifford of Piltown in 1729. The Glascotts and the Giffords were to own most of Sutton’s Parish in time. Under the marriage agreement,George took over the lands of Piltown,Whitechurch and Ballykelly. Before George died he divided his estate between his sons Francis and John. Francis received Piltown and Whitechurch while John took over Alderton or Ballyfarnogue.

When Francis Glascott died in 1798 his son Rev.William Glascott succeeded him at Piltown. He was the Rector of the Parishes of Killesk and St.James, Dunbrody. When he died in 1829 he was succeeded by his second son William Madden Glascott. This William also inherited Alderton. He was Justice of the Peace and High Sheriff of Wexford in 1834.

The next Glascott was William’s son-also William- who was a Captain in the 30th foot regiment.When he died in 1917 he had an estate of 2,821 acres.

The Glacotts are buried in Whitechurch graveyard and Killesk.

Glascotts plot in Whitechurch

Glascotts plot in Whitechurch

 

The last Glascott,Philip Jocelyn Glascott, died without children in 1933. Alderton House was sold to Major Robert George Cazalet. This ended 270 years of the Glascott family connection. Cazalet owned a private plane. Also the remains of the Glascott bacon factory can be seen and a circular silage tower.

Colonel Neville Cairns bought Alderton from Mrs.Cazalet in 1958 and was a noted horseman. He hunted with the Wexford Hounds. Patrick Cairns and his wife Monica are the current owners and are in the farming business.

 

Last of the Glasotts at Alderton

Last of the Glasotts at Alderton

 

From left: Fanny Isabella (2nd wife of Captain William Glascott), Jocelyn’s wife from Dublin, Philip Jocelyn, Captain William Glascott and Arthur Moberry Glascott.

Kate Nolan,nee O'Brien, working at Glascotts of Alderton, early in the last century. She was a sister of Paddy O'Brien the blacksmith at Whitechurch.

Kate Nolan,nee O'Brien, working at Glascotts of Alderton, early in the last century. She was a sister of Paddy O'Brien the blacksmith at Whitechurch.

Landscape House

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Landscape House

Landscape House

 

Landscape House was built in a beautiful setting overlooking the River Barrow. Samuel Lewis wrote in 1837 “Landscape, now the residence of John Ussher Esq., derives its name from the beautiful view it embraces of the river and the ornamental grounds of Castle Annaghs on the opposite bank; it is surrounded with a fine plantation of fir,sycamore,beech and oak trees. “He could write the same today (2007).

This branch of the Ussher family hailed from Cappagh, Co.Waterford. The family had as a member James Ussher, the protestant archbishop of Armagh who was a famous scholar. The original male of the family is thought to have acted as an ‘usher’ to King John-hence the name Ussher. John Ussher of Landscape married Lucy the daughter of Rev.William Glascott of Alderton. He died in 1844.

The house was given to June Drake by her father Dean Drake of Stokestown as a wedding gift when she married Major James Stewart. She was his only daughter. The house was purchased by John Becker in the 60′s and is now the residence of Heidi Becker.

An usual landscape feature found at the front of the house was known as a ha-ha. This was an eighteenth century ditch or moat dug at the front to keep farm animals away from the house. Yet, it didn’t block the view of the surrounding land like a wall or fence would.