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Ballybrazil Graveyard

 

Entrance to graveyard

Entrance to graveyard

 

 

Ballybrazil graveyard is about one kilometre from Scoil Mhuire. It’s a very ancient religious site and is believed to be the oldest graveyard in County Wexford. Nowadays Ballybrazil is a townland but was once a parish in the Barony of Shelburne. In the 1830′s it had over 384 inhabitants. It consisted of the townlands Ballybrazil, Aclare, Ballykerogue More, Ballysop, Coolerin North and South,Curraghduff and Milltown. Before Cromwell invaded in 1649 this land was owned by the Suttons and consisted of 2,370 acres. It was later owned by Rev.William Gifford who was the local landlord. He lived in Ballysop House and died in 1866.

 

View of graveyard from distance

View of graveyard from distance

 

The graveyard is rectangular and is surrounded by a stone wall. It is very like a ráth or ancient fort. It measures 94 metres by 86 metres. This enclosure also contained a church but only the grass covered foundations can be made out. In 1837 when Samuel Lewis published his study of Co. Wexford,Ballybrazil church was in ruins. A holy well, dedicated to St.Crone, was nearby. The site could also have had a fosse or moat around it.

 

The graveyard can be entered either by gate or stepping stones.

 

Stone wall

Stone wall

 

Cross family headstones and stone tablets

Cross family headstones and stone tablets

 

In the 1850′s Henry Cross rented over 37 acres from Rev.Gifford at £21 per year.He lived in Ballysop. Another headstone which is of interest was erected by Michael Doherty of Ballykelly.

 

Headstone at Ballybrazil Graveyard

Headstone at Ballybrazil Graveyard

The inscription reads:

‘Erected by Michael Doherty, Ballykelly, in memory of his father Richard Doherty who died in 1861 and his mother Anne, alias Glascott,who died in 1867 aged 78 years.’ Richard Doherty,who lived in the townland of Ballybrazil, rented over 25 acres at a rate of £18 per year.

 

The Irish for Ballybrazil is Baile Uí Bhreasáil. The name of the original Irish owner of Ballybrazil was Ó Breasáil. The translation is ‘the townland of the son of Brazil’ and we can see that Ó Breasáil must have been an important and wealthy man to give his name to both the townland and parish. When the Normans came they kept these same names of the townlands and parishes and turned them into manors.

 

In the 1800′s a small woollen mill was to be found in Ballybrazil and provided welcome employment. In 1798 the headquarters of the rebel army was in Ballysop House which is closeby.

Please remember that this ancient graveyard is still in use. Seán Crowley.

Ballykerogue Church

 

Ballykerogue Church from the west

Ballykerogue Church from the west

 

About 200 metres from Ballykerogue castle is Ballykerogue church and graveyard. The castle was the main residence of the Suttons. Roger de Sutton came on the norman landing with Robert Fitzstephen in 1169 and received land from Hervey de Monte Marisco. He probably built the church here. It is a medieval church and was at one time the parish church of Ballybrazil. The church is situated on the north east side of the graveyard. The North, South and East walls still stand and a portion of the West wall.

 

East wall of church

East wall of church

 

The church measures 8 metres from East to West or 27 feet. It is over 6 metres from North to South or 20 feet. The height of the North and South walls is 2.5 metres or 8 feet. There is a small window on the east wall with two alcoves on either side. There are also two ledges which now have flower pots on them. A number of very old flag stones can be seen on the ground.

 

South wall

South wall

 

The south wall also has a narrow window with an alcove to its left. These alcoves could have been used for storing sacred vessels. The north wall has one window as well. There is a parapet on the top of the north and south walls.

 

Holy water font

Holy water font

 

An interesting feature can be seen close to the west entrance. It is a holy water font or a stoup which was carved from granite. It is built into the wall and could also have been the baptismal font.

When Cromwell attacked Ballykerogue castle in 1649 we don’t know whether he also attacked the church.

 

Ballykerogue Cemetery with east wall of church in background

Ballykerogue Cemetery with east wall of church in background

 

Please remember that this ancient graveyard is still in use. Seán Crowley.

Ballykerogue Lime Kiln

 

Kiln at Ballykerogue

Kiln at Ballykerogue

 

This is the lime kiln at Ballykerogue and is very well preserved. It is over twenty feet in height and has two openings or eyes which look like large chimneys.The lime kiln was used for burning lime which was used as fertilizer on the land. It was also used for lime washing the walls of houses before paint became more widely used.Outhouses were also lime washed.Some farmers were also known to dip seed potatoes in lime before planting to give a better yield as lime or Calcium Carbonate is needed for acid soil. Lime was used to make mortar for building also.

 

The Ballykerogue kiln dates from around 1800 and was built by the Murphy family. The limestone boulders were brought from a quarry in Granagh Co. Kilkenny which is about three miles from Waterford City.The Hook Head also had limestone quarries and the limestone was transported to other parts of County Wexford. Back at the kiln the lime stones had to be broken down to much smaller pieces so that they would burn . These slabs were about an inch thick and were broken by a stone expert.

 

Next the kiln was fired.The fuel to burn the lime was elm and culm which is a coal dust. The coal came from Castlecomer in Co.Kilkenny.Coal was better than wood as it produced more heat. A layer of dry elm wood would be placed on the bottom of the pot. Sometimes straw was used. The pot is the large circular part of the kiln with its opening on the top. It was also known as the ‘oven’. Next a layer of the broken limestone was added and then a layer of culm followed by more stone and so on until the pot was filled to the top.Then the kiln was lit or fired. Sometimes diesel was added to the timber as it would burn quicker. This was then set alight through the opening or the eye of the kiln.The kiln could burn for up to five days.As each layer of stones burned it fell to the bottom of the pot. Finally the snow white lime was brought out through the eye of the kiln. Stones which didn’t burn were called ‘scalders’.Turf, which was hand cut with a sleán, was used as the fuel in other areas.

 

Eoin M. stands in the 'eye' of the kiln

Eoin M. stands in the 'eye' of the kiln

 

The larger eye (opening) measures ten feet across and the smaller one nearly eight feet. The two arches look very impressive. The inside of the pot was built with firestone.The kiln was built so that a horse and cart could load and unload the coal and stones at the top.These carts had large iron band wheels. The opening of the pot in Ballykerogue kiln is filled in with bushes for safety to both humans and animals. Hart’s in Campile used to burn lime and this was bought by local farmers. The lime was delivered on the River Pill by boat.

 

Lime is no longer burnt in kilns but is still used as a fertilizer. It’s important that we preserve kilns as they remind us of our past and the hard ship people suffered doing this hard work to make their and our lives better.

 

This kiln is at Priesthaggard and a ramp was build to allow carts access to the 'pot' of the kiln or the 'oven' on top.

This kiln is at Priesthaggard and a ramp was build to allow carts access to the 'pot' of the kiln or the 'oven' on top.

 

Erin and Bille-Jean at the Limekiln in Whitechurch. Here limestones were burned to make lime for the local farmers. This kiln has 3 openings. Lime was also used to white wash the farmers’ houses. The River Barrow flows nearby and barges used bring in the coal and other goods. It is known as Piltown Stage.

Erin and Bille-Jean at the Limekiln in Whitechurch. Here limestones were burned to make lime for the local farmers. This kiln has 3 openings. Lime was also used to white wash the farmers’ houses. The River Barrow flows nearby and barges used bring in the coal and other goods. It is known as Piltown Stage.

 

Dunbrody Kiln with its double opening is to be seen alongside  the railway line

Dunbrody Kiln with its double opening is to be seen alongside the railway line

 

Thanks to Eoin M. and Gavin M. (4th class-03/04 Ballykerogue) for some of the research on this topic

Ballyvelig Urn at Carrickshawn

 

Viewing the urn are Nicholas Murphy,Kilmokea.William Whelan,Ballyvelig and Prof.R.A.S. Mac Alister of U.C.D.

Viewing the urn are Nicholas Murphy,Kilmokea.William Whelan,Ballyvelig and Prof.R.A.S. Mac Alister of U.C.D.

 

A major find from the Bronze Age was made in our parish in 1935. This was a Bronze Age urn and from this we can learn how Campile man lived around 1500BC. An urn was used to store the ashes of the dead person. Burnt bones were also found here in the 1800′s. The bones were put in a cist grave which was a pit lined with stones.

 

The urn found in Carrickshawn is a particular type known as a food vessel. Food was placed in it for the journey to the next world and so they believed in an after-life over 4,000 years ago. The food vessel was made from local clay and straw was sometimes added to strenghten the clay. Designs were carved on the pottery. When dry the pot was heated first in the sun and was then fired at a temperature of about 600ºC. The fire was a large open one of timber.

 

Drawing of urn at Ballyvelig

Drawing of urn at Ballyvelig

 

The above is a completed drawing of the food vessel. It was found when Mr.Whelan was repairing a ditch. Luckily, he realised it was something of importance.It was found with its mouth or opening faced downwards.No cist grave was found nearby.Part of it was missing and so it’s presumed that it was damaged by earlier fence workers.The vessel is 32cm in height and 30cm in diameter.The design consists of grooves of parallel lines and triangles.The design is also found on the inside rim.

 

The food vessel can now been seen in the National Museum in Dublin.

 

Ballyvelig Urn in National Museum,Dublin

Ballyvelig Urn in National Museum,Dublin

 

View of the spot where the urn was found.

View of the spot where the urn was found.

Bronze Age Fulacht Fia

 

Fulacht Fia in Wexford Heritage Park

Fulacht Fia in Wexford Heritage Park

 

Fulact Fia meaning

 

Two Fulacht Fias were found in Ballyvelig. You can see the burnt stones that were left. They are horse-shoe shaped. They show us how Bronze Age people cooked deer and wild pigs.

 

Hunting was a favourite sport in Ireland. After the hunt whatever they had caught they would cook the animal on the Fulacht Fia. First they dug a trough and lined it with wood in side. Then they made a fire with wood or turf and added layers of stones. Next they lit a fire near the trough. Once the wood had burnt they rolled the boiling hot stones into a trough full of water. They used a log or big club to do this. This heated the water.They got the water from a stream nearby. Then they cut the meat and wrapped it in straw (or sugán) and threw it in the trough. Once the meat was cooked they threw the stones away.

 

Fulact Stone Mound

Fulact Stone Mound Drawing by Sadie

 

Fulact Water Trough

Fulact Water Trough Drawing by Sadie

 

Fulact Fia Stones Burning on Wood

Fulact Fia Stones Burning on Wood by Sadie

Campile Bombing

 

Devastation at Shelburne Co-Op after the bombing

Devastation at Shelburne Co-Op after the bombing

 

The event for which our village, Campile, is most famous for is the bombing. This happened on Monday August 26th, 1940 between 1.50pm and 2.10pm. Three local girls were killed. Ireland was neutral and had no part in the war. The three who died were Mary Ellen Kent (30), her sister Katherine Kent (26) and Kathleen Hurley (27). The Kent girls were from Terrerath and Kathleen Hurley was from Garryduff. Mary Ellen was the manageress in the restaurant and Katherine (Kitty) worked in the drapery department. Kathleen also worked in the restaurant.

 

The Co-op was badly destroyed. The dining room or restaurant got the worst of the blast. Part of the train track was tore up. Luckily only three people were killed as 40 others had just left the restaurant or gone home for lunch.The first bomb was the fatal explosion which killed the three girls. It hit the restaurant and creamery part of the Co-op. The second bomb went through the roof and started a fire. A third bomb hit the window of the co-op and damaged the railway line. The fourth bomb landed in a field and left a massive crater or hole in the ground. Four bombs were dropped that day in Campile.

 

The crater made by the bomb near the railway line

The crater made by the bomb near the railway line

 

The stationmaster’s house was badly damaged and his hens were killed. It is said that slates went through the air like pieces of paper as did gates, doors and glass. The bombs made a terrible roar people said. Lots of people like Kitty Shannon had lucky escapes.

We also read about a lorry full of soldiers coming to help from New Ross. They overturned at the bad bend in Ballinamóna which is very close to our school and three of them were badly injured.

 

This is a bomb fragment  Tom Grennan from Ballykerogue gave us to look at in school. There was a great demand for bomb fragments after the bombing by souvenir hunters. 'Skillet pots' came in useful to satisfy the  crowds whe descended on Campile.

This is a bomb fragment Tom Grennan from Ballykerogue gave us to look at in school. There was a great demand for bomb fragments after the bombing by souvenir hunters. 'Skillet pots' came in useful to satisfy the crowds whe descended on Campile.

 

There are many reasons told why Campile was bombed.

 

Some say that English soldiers were found with butter wrappers from the creamery by the Germans. Others say the Germans were lost and dropped their pay load as fuel may have been running low and they were returning home.The third reason is that they thought they were in Pembroke in Wales as navigation standards weren’t great and it is possible English intelligence cold bend their radar and put the German plane off course.

 

The latter two reasons are the most likely for the bombing, causing the first fatalities in Ireland during World War 2.

 

Josephine and Francis Mc.Crohan,daughters of the stationmaster Paul,had a lucky escape.The roof of the stationhouse was badly damaged and their fowl were killed.

Josephine and Francis Mc.Crohan,daughters of the stationmaster Paul,had a lucky escape.The roof of the stationhouse was badly damaged and their fowl were killed.

 

Another picture of the damage caused by the bombs

Another picture of the damage caused by the bombs

 

Shelburne Co-Op in all its glory 2003

Shelburne Co-Op in all its glory 2003

 

Memorial Plaque on Shelburne Co-Op wall

Memorial Plaque on Shelburne Co-Op wall

 

A fine Memorial Garden to remember the three girls and the Campile bombing, was unveiled in the village by Mr. Seán Connick TD on August 28th 2010. This was the 70th anniversaty of the German bombing.

A fine Memorial Garden to remember the three girls and the Campile bombing, was unveiled in the village by Mr. Seán Connick TD on August 28th 2010. This was the 70th anniversaty of the German bombing.

 

What is Campile Like Today

The Co-op had to be re-built but the creamery wasn’t. The railway was also repaired and the other damaged buildings. We have big shops like Centra and the Co-op is now with Glanbia. There are three pubs. The Co-op has a memorial sign up for the three girls who were killed. There are four housing estates in Campile. There’s a chip shop, a soccer pitch, a parochial hall, and two hair salons.We also have a Garda station,post office, a chemist and a drapery. Our village looks much better now than it did on that day in 1940 long ago.

 

Dunbrody Abbey

 

Fáilte chuig Mainistir Dhún Bróith. Welcome to Dunbrody Abbey & Visitor Centre.

Fáilte chuig Mainistir Dhún Bróith. Welcome to Dunbrody Abbey & Visitor Centre.

Built in 1182 by the Norman Knight Hervey de Monte Marisco who was Strongbow’s uncle. It’s 820 years old. It’s been called the “Noblest pile of all” as it has the best ruins of any abbey of that period. Dunbrody is a Cistercian Abbey. Monks wore white robes and they prayed, worked and helped the poor and gave the people protection.

 

It was common for the Normans to build a monastery or an abbey in the new area they had taken over. The first Cistercian Abbey built in Ireland was in Mellifont Co.Louth by St.Malachy. Hervey felt it would be good for his soul in the next world because of the Norman slaughter especially at Baginbun. Hervey had his base at Great Island which was once known as Hervey’s Island.

 

He first gave the Dunbrody land to the Cistercians of Buildwas in Shropshire in England. A monk called Alan was sent over to Dunbrody to check out the new site.He found the place to be wild and desolate and found the natives to be ferocious. His home was in a hollow oak tree and he quickly returned home to Buildwas with his sad tale.

View showing River Pill and remains of West Window

View showing River Pill and remains of West Window

 

This is a painting of Dunbrody Abbey by Gabriel Beranger from around 1780. You can see the Great West Window which fell in 1852. The title is Dunbrawdy Abbey which is the correct pronounciation.

This is a painting of Dunbrody Abbey by Gabriel Beranger from around 1780. You can see the Great West Window which fell in 1852. The title is Dunbrawdy Abbey which is the correct pronounciation.

 

What abbey looked like originally

What abbey looked like originally

 

The monks of Buildwas then gave the lands to St. Mary’s of Dublin and began the building of Dunbrody in 1182. They were delighted with their new lands. The site was ideal as it was near where the local River Pill flows into the Barrow and was surrounded by forests. The monks had good fishing and hunting grounds. So they had plenty salmon and venison and they also collected tolls or taxes from people using the river. The Abbey was now known as the Port of St.Mary’s as it offered safety to people in trouble or on the run from their enemies. It was dedicated to the Blessed Virgin.

 

Hervey, even though married, became a monk in the Abbey.He died there at the age of 75 in 1205. His tomb and his statue, which were near the high altar, were destroyed by soldiers from Duncannon Fort in 1798.

 

In 1195 Pope Celestine placed the Abbey under the protection of St.Peter and St.Paul. The townlands granted to Dunbrody were Curraghmore, Drillistown, Dunbrody,Coole, Ballyhack, Ballygow, Balystraw, Ballyvelig, Balliniry, Coleman, Clonsharragh, Haggard, Boderan, Clonlard, Kilhile, Mersheen, Monachee, Nook, Ramsgrange, Duncannon, Balliniry, Rosetown, Saltmills, Shielbaggan, Grange and Tinnock. They also got over 200 acres in Great Island and some reclaimed land in Kilmannock.

 

There is a story of where the Abbot of Dunbrody and two of his monks put a monk from nearby Tintern Abbey in prison for three days and robbed him of two horses and money. There was trouble between the two abbeys over what land each owned.

Boreen an Bháis with the Abbey in the background

Boreen an Bháis with the Abbey in the background

 

This is a picture of the lane which goes from Ballyvelig to Dunbrody Castle. The story goes that a party of monks were strolling along one evening saying their vespers or evening prayers when they were attacked by some of the native Irish. It is said that they were slaughtered and the lane became known as Bóithrín a Bás or the Lane of Slaughter. Some call it the Bloody Lane.It could also because of a fierce battle fought here between the Etchinghams and Chichesters over the abbey lands as the Chichesters became owners through Jane Etchingham’s marriage to Arthur Chichester in 1660.

St.Mogue's Church of Ireland in Fethard

St.Mogue's Church of Ireland in Fethard

 

Baptismal Font from Dunbrody Abbey

Baptismal Font from Dunbrody Abbey

 

The next important Abbot was Alexander Devereux. He knew that the protestant King Henry 8th was going to suppress or destroy Dunbrody Abbey. He gave the lands to his brother. He then changed his religion and became the first protestant Bishop of Ferns and went to live in Fethard-on-Sea closeby. Alexander brought with him the baptismal font from the Abbey and this font is still in use today in St.Mogue’s Church. St.Mogue is another name for St.Aidan the patron saint of Wexford.

 

He was the first catholic Bishop of Ferns. Alexander is buried in St.Mogues Church. On the 6th may 1536 Henry 8th ordered Dunbrody Abbey to be suppressed or banned.The abbey was plundered and made unfit for any monks to come back and live there. All valuables went to the king. The lead from the roof was melted down and could be used to make ammunition. The wood from the roof was used for fire in the smelting. Dunbrody Abbey was now bare and its religious life at an end. Alexander later changed back to his Catholic religion before he died.

 

The abbey was suppressed and the monks banned by the protestant Henry VIII.

The abbey was suppressed and the monks banned by the protestant Henry VIII.

 

Dunbrody Abbey Seal

Dunbrody Abbey Seal

 

The bronze Dunbrody Abbey seal was found in Kilhile Castle in 1852.It is about 4cm wide. The abbot is sitting on a throne with a canopy or covering over him. He has a crozier in his right hand and his head is bare. Around the seal is written in Latin ‘Contrasigilluim Domus Sccs Marie de Portu’ which means the seal of Saint Mary of Refuge. Patrick Belfast,the Marquis of Donegal has the seal.

 

Drop in on our lovely Dunbrody Abbey sometime.

Drop in on our lovely Dunbrody Abbey sometime.

 

Visit the maze,castle and craft shop.

Visit the maze,castle and craft shop.

 

Dunbrody Abbey Dolls House

Dunbrody Abbey Dolls House

 

Please remember Dunbrody Abbey is a National Monument. Guided tours are available and the abbey should be treated with respect.
Seán Crowley.

Eviction at Foley’s Fort

 

Picture of Foley's Fort taken around 1900

Picture of Foley's Fort taken around 1900

 

This is the sound of the battering ram being used during an eviction. Foley’s Fort is only about a mile from our school and Victor Murphy lives there now.It is in Ballykerogue. The eviction happened on October 21st 1887.

 

Back in 1887 it was owned by David Foley. His son was called Laurence. Laurence was involved in the Land League . The tenants wanted a fair rent and to own their own property. The “Plan of Campaign” was started. This meant the tenants would decide what was a fair rent and would not pay large rents anymore. The tenants of Sutton’s Parish asked the local landlord,Tottenham, to reduce the rent by 25%. He refused. The tenants then refused to pay any rent. Tottenham then decided to evict the tenant with the most land and this was David Foley. But Foley didn’t go quietly.

 

Twenty one of the strongest men from the the parish were picked to defend the house The men heard from a drunken policeman when the eviction would take place and then barricaded the house and got ready for the fight. They had the house defended like a “fort” or fortress and no one could get in. Laurence or Larry was the man who led the tenants.

 

About 150 police came to Foley’s by boat as well as twelve Emergencymen. These had crowbars and would do the battering. They were hated.

 

What the eviction scene looked like to Pearl P. in 4th class(03)

What the eviction scene looked like to Pearl P. in 4th class(03)

 

It is said that there were 10,000 people at Foley’s that morning. The Campile Fife and Drum band was there. A famous priest from Ramsgrange was there called Canon Doyle. He went to all the evictions around trying to make peace.The notice of eviction was nailed to Foley’s door at 9.30 am. Canon Doyle heard the men’s confession as the Emergency men were armed.The men inside were asked to come out. They refused and the fight began at 10 am.

 

The crowbars went to work at the back of the house. The men inside threw stones,slates and anything they could find at them. The best weapon they had was hot sheep dip. This was sprayed from hoses.This battle went on for four hours with cheers from the crowd for the men inside and boos for the Landlord’s men.

 

An eviction scene

An eviction scene

 

The emergency men then took a break and must have felt like giving up. They attacked again at the back of the house. They tried to widen a hole already made here but were met with bars of iron by the men inside and sheep dip.Canon Doyle tried to stop the eviction and make peace. He told the people there to go home and the band led them away. Fires were lit along the road. The head RIC man went into the house through the hole in the wall. The men asked him for water and later two policemen with water burst in through the breach in the wall. The men were drinking tea and taken by surprise. Later the sheriff arrested the men and took them first to Ballybrazil Barracks. They sang “God save Ireland”. They were then taken to New Ross and finally to Wexford Jail.

 

A huge crowd was at their trial in Arthurstown and the army from Duncannon had to be called in to control them. The men were given sentences from three to six months but managed to get out on bail. They were given a great cheer when released. Two of the defenders of Foley’s Fort were nephews of Patrick Kennedy from Dunganstown. Patrick left for Boston in 1848 and was President Kennedy’s great grand-father. The two were James and Patrick Kennedy. Larry Foley went to live in Ballykerogue Castle,after his jail sentence. This was the home or seat of the Sutton Family, after which Horeswood Parish is named.

 

James Kennedy(1857-1932) a nephew of President Kennedy's great-grandfather, was in Foley's Fort with twenty other men.

James Kennedy(1857-1932) a nephew of President Kennedy's great-grandfather, was in Foley's Fort with twenty other men.

 

Great Island Power Station

 

Great island Power Station

Great island Power Station

 

Great Island power station is about 3 miles from our school. The signpost for it is right outside the school. Great Island was once called Hervey’s Island after the norman knight Hervey de Monte Marisco. The island no longer exists. Great Island was the first oil power station to be built outside our main cities of Dublin and Cork.

 

The building of the station started in 1963 and finished in 1967. It was opened by P.J Lawlor in Nov.1968 and blessed by Bishop Donal Herlihy the then Bishop of Ferns. It is built on 168 acres of land.The station is built near where the River Barrow joins the River Suir.The fuel used is oil. It was built on the River Barrow so that oil tankers can bring oil in. The oil is stored on oil farms at the station. There are 2 small generators of 60 megawatts and a larger one at 120 MW. There are 5 huge storage tanks and each holds 17,000 tons of oil. There are two compounds with transformers also.

 

The oil is heated to a temperature of 135°C in the burners. The steam made is then used to turn blades in the turbine and this drives the generator. A generator is like an electric motor with a magnet surrounded by coils of wire which spin. Next, the electricity made is sent to a transformer and then is fed to the National Grid. All the power stations feed into the grid.

The chimneys are 450 feet high. Huge silencers were installed so that local people will not be annoyed by the noise when the sets or generators are starting up.

In 1993 they refurbished the station and it cost 9 million pounds. All waste is treated at the station so that there is no pollution.

 

At the moment the E.S.B employs 70 workers at Great Island station.

 

John Stafford, a worker in Great Island power station, demonstrates the working of a miniature steam engine for 5th and 6th class pupils. This is the same principle that the power station uses to generate electricity.

John Stafford, a worker in Great Island power station, demonstrates the working of a miniature steam engine for 5th and 6th class pupils. This is the same principle that the power station uses to generate electricity.

Hedge Schools in Parish

 

Click on image below to go view full table.

Hedge Schools in Horeswood

Hedge Schools in Horeswood

Horizontal Mill at Kilmokea, Great Island

 

Mill Stone at Kilmokea

Mill Stone at Kilmokea

 

A mill stone and a wooden flume were found in Kilmokea in the 1960′s during drainage work. These were part of a Horizontal Water Mill which were used in Ireland from about the 7th century. They were one of the first automatic machines used here. They are called Horizontal Mills because the wooden wheel which provided the power was layed flat in the water. Most mills in Wexford are of the vertical type or upright like Foulksmills and Castlebridge.The mill was probably used by all the local people in the community as grain growing was always part of Irish farming. It was an easier way to grind the corn than using the quern stone as much more could be ground with the mill.

 

The stone found was the upper millstone and measures 68cm (27inches) in diameter. It has circular grooves from the centre outwards.

 

Elm Flume at Kilmokea

Elm Flume at Kilmokea

 

The flume has been carbon dated to around 1279.As there was once a monastery here in Kilmokea it’s possible that the mill was used by the monks.The water came from the stream and was directed by the flume on to the mill wheel.As the flow of water increases the wheel turns faster and its axle then turned the upper millstone. Below this stone was the lower stone which didn’t turn.The grain was fed in from the hopper and ground between the two stones.

 

The Hopper with the millstones(Heritage Park,Wexford)

The Hopper with the millstones(Heritage Park,Wexford)

 

Before the corn was ground it had to be dried but there is no evidence of a Corn-drying Kiln in the area.

Our Hurling Heritage

 

Laurence,Nicola, Tomás and Micheál on top of Sliabh Coillte. Feb 5th 2005

Laurence,Nicola, Tomás and Micheál on top of Sliabh Coillte. Feb 5th 2005

 

The following is an extract from the Folklore of Co.Wexford collected by Bridget Nash of Nash,Cassagh,a pupil in Gusserane NS in 1938. She collected it from Martin Doyle of the same address. It shows that hurling was played in Horeswood before the GAA was started in 1884. There was a famous hurling green near the summit of Sliabh Coillte around the year 1880. There was no road to the viewing point back then and both players and spectators had to climb to the playing green.

 

‘Long ago hurling matches were played on top of Slieve Coillte mountain, the nearest mountain to where I live. All townlands and parish matches were finished there. The top of the mountain is level and at each end of the playground they used have a long thin sally with both ends stuck down in the ground. It took the shape of a loop and when the ball passed through it, it was counted a score. At each side of the loop there was a man to see if the ball went through and when it did he raised a green flag. All lookers-on would know it was a score. There was also a referee out among the players. Hurleys were made of ash in different shapes and sizes to suit the players. The local carpenters made them. The number of men in each team was seventeen. A match often lasted two and a half hours. The players wore nothing only a shirt and trousers and they wore nothing on their feet. The hurling balls were all made by shoemakers. This type of game died out in most of Ireland in the nineteenth century due mainly to the landlords’ loss of interest.

 

Long ago football and hurling were played in a different way to what they are played to-day. Instead of playing from goal to goal as they do nowadays they played from ditch to ditch. Thirty years ago one of the roughest matches of the day was played in Foulksmills between a team from Taghmon and another from Campile. The match which lasted for two and a half hours was supposed to be the roughest ever played in the district. They fought and hurt each other until there was only two men left on the field, Campile taking the victory by four “overs” to three’.

 

Hurling on Sliabh Coillte around 1958: Back: Paddy Grennan, Dick Crosbie, Noel Culleton. Front: Ray Culleton,Bill Murphy, Tommy Grennan, Michael Murphy.

Hurling on Sliabh Coillte around 1958: Back: Paddy Grennan, Dick Crosbie, Noel Culleton. Front: Ray Culleton,Bill Murphy, Tommy Grennan, Michael Murphy.

 

Another story concerns an incident which occurred in the 1880′s. On one occasion a local team was fixed to play a Cork team. The landlord in the Ballykelly area at the time was a Captain Gifford and a native of Cork. Jimmy Quinn was the star player on the local team and Gifford dispatched him on foot to Dublin with a letter the day before the game. Jimmy managed to make the return trip, much to the surprise Captain Gifford, and to help his team beat their Cork opponents.

 

The Rev. Thomas Handcock,Church of Ireland Rector for Whitechurch and Kilmokea,wrote in 1816 about the people of the present day Horeswood parish: “The lower classes are uncommonly fond of dancing and the young men of ball playing: for these amusements they assemble in multitudes in the evenings of Sundays and Holydays and no instance of disorder has ever known to occur on these occasions”

 

Two Hurling Greats from Horeswood

 

This is a picture of the Wexford All Ireland hurling team from 1955 and has two Horeswood men on it.

This is a picture of the Wexford All Ireland hurling team from 1955 and has two Horeswood men on it.

 

Back row left to right: K.Sheehan (trainer), P.Kehoe, J.Morrissey, M.Codd, N.Rackard, T. Ryan, T.Bolger, O.Gough, W.Wickham, M. O’Hanlon, T.Dixon, H.O’Connor, E.Wheeler.

Front row (left to right): T.Flood, B.Rackard, J.English, P.Kehoe, M Morrissey, N. O’Donnell (capt.) A Foley, C.Casey, W.Rackard, D. Hearne, S.Bluett, P.Hayes.

 

Mick O’Hanlon won two All Ireland medals in 1955 and 56 and four Leinster medals. Dominic Hearne won an All Ireland medal in 1955 and three Leinster medals.